There’s a Book for That: National American Indian Heritage Month

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There’s a Book for That: National American Indian Heritage Month

November is National American Indian Heritage Month— a time to celebrate the rich and diverse cultures, traditions, and histories of Native people. It is also an opportune time to raise awareness of the challenges Native people have faced and the ways in which tribal citizens have worked to conquer these challenges. In commemoration of the culture and people who were the original settlers of this land, we present the following recently published, and acclaimed, titles for adults and young readers alike:

 

Oak Flat by Lauren RednissOAK FLAT: A FIGHT FOR SACRED LAND IN THE AMERICAN WEST by Lauren Redniss

A powerful work of visual nonfiction about three generations of an Apache family struggling to protect sacred land from a multinational mining corporation, by MacArthur “Genius” and National Book Award finalist Lauren Redniss.

 

 

Carry by Toni JensenCARRY: A MEMOIR OF SURVIVAL ON STOLEN LAND by Toni Jensen

Goop Book Club Pick • Finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize

A powerful, poetic memoir about what it means to exist as an Indigenous woman in America, told in snapshots of the author’s encounters with gun violence.

“Essential…We need more voices like Toni Jensen’s, more books like Carry.”—Tommy Orange

 

Tecumseh and the Prophet by Peter CozzensTECUMSEH AND THE PROPHET: THE HEROIC STRUGGLE FOR AMERICA’S HEARTLAND by Peter Cozzens

The first biography of the great Shawnee leader in more than twenty years, and the first to make clear that his misunderstood younger brother, Tenskwatawa, was an equal partner in the last great pan-Indian alliance against the United States.

 

 

Yellow Bird by Sierra Crane MurdochYELLOW BIRD: OIL, MURDER, AND A WOMAN’S SEARCH FOR JUSTICE IN INDIAN COUNTRY by Sierra Crane Murdoch

The true crime story of a murder on an Indian reservation, and the unforgettable Arikara woman who becomes obsessed with solving it—an urgent, page-turning work of literary journalism and social criticism.

 

 

As Long as Grass Grows by Dina Gilio-WhitakerAS LONG AS GRASS GROWS: THE INDIGENOUS FIGHT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE, FROM COLONIZATION TO STANDING ROCK by Dina Gilio-Whitaker

The story of Native peoples’ resistance to environmental injustice and land incursions, and a call for environmentalists to learn from the Indigenous community’s rich history of activism.

 

 

American Indian Stories by Zitkala-SaAMERICAN INDIAN STORIES by Zitkala-Sa, Layli Long Soldier

A groundbreaking Lakota author and activist chronicles her refusal to assimilate into 19th century white society and her mission to preserve her culture.

 

 

 

Killers of the Flower Moon by David GrannKILLERS OF THE FLOWER MOON: THE OSAGE MURDERS AND THE BIRTH OF THE FBI by David Grann

NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST

David Grann has chronicled a twisting, haunting true-life murder mystery about the systematic killing of Native Americans from the Osage Nation in 1920s Oklahoma, inspired by greed for their oil wealth.

 

Code Talker by Chester Nez and Judith Schiess AvilaCODE TALKER by Chester Nez

The first and only memoir by one of the original Navajo code talkers of WWII. The book includes the actual Navajo code and rare pictures.

 

 

 

The Turquoise Ledge by Leslie Marmon SilkoTHE TURQUOISE LEDGE: A MEMOIR by Leslie Marmon Silko

From the author of Ceremony comes profound reflections on family and the natural world-from the legendary Native American author. Ambitious in scope and full of wonderfully plainspoken and evocative lyricism, The Turquoise Ledge is both an exploration of Silko’s experience and a moving and deeply personal contemplation of the enormous spiritual power of the natural world.

 

The Wind Is My Mother by Bear HeartTHE WIND IS MY MOTHER: THE LIFE AND TEACHINGS OF A NATIVE AMERICAN SHAMAN by Bear Heart

With eloquent simplicity, Native American medicine man Bear Heart demonstrates how traditional tribal wisdom can help us maintain spiritual and physical health in today’s world.

 

For more on these and related titles visit National American Indian Heritage Month

Visit https://nativeamericanheritagemonth.gov/ for events and resources.


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Her fiction writing has received the Author / Ambassador at Library Journal Self-e Authors, Winner Queen of the West Reader Favorite Award, Amazon Bestseller - Historical, Double finalist in the Next Generation Indie Book Awards in the Mystery and Humorous Categories. Writing humorous cozy mysteries and romantic comedy, Jocie can find humor in most everything, even when she shouldn't. She lives in the Midwest on Dust Bunny Farm with her family.